Thursday FACTS – Transgender History (Pt1) Let’s start at the beginning…

I feel like I am constantly having to do this, and I shouldn’t have too. But you know, if other people with much more powerful and bigger platforms wont, I will.

First though, some lovely music, by the wonderful Billy Porter with “back up” singing by the Pose actors.

The ironic parts

One thing I have noticed about TERFs, especially is that they are really into Yoga and mediation, both of which come from Hinduism. Now, if you know much Hinduism. In Hinduism, there are diverse approaches to God and gender. Many Hindus focus upon impersonal Absolute (Brahman) which is genderless. Other Hindu traditions conceive God as androgynous (both female and male), alternatively as either male or female, while cherishing gender henotheism, that is without denying the existence of other Gods in either gender.

Also the God of Yoga, is Shiva, who is MALE. Yoga does not come from a female Goddess. The is just one of the things that happens, when you don’t know what you’re talking about. Personally, I LOVE being able to tell TERFs this. What I don’t tell them though the use of icons is not restricted to male forms. It takes various forms and shapes. The Shaivites and Vaishnavites worship God in non-anthropomorphic, symbolic male-female images as well, such as the lingayoni and Saligram respectively. In their literature, the principle of God’s true nature as sexless.

Basically, Hinduism (which was only given it’s English definition recently), doesn’t have a “dogma”. Hindu beliefs are vast and diverse, and thus Hinduism is often referred to as a family of religions rather than a single religion. Which is probably why a lot of their Gods, sex and gender are swappable.

Sumerian and Akkadian texts from 4500 years ago document transgender or transvestite priests known as gala and by other names. A grave of a possibly transgender person in Europe has been identified from 4500 years ago, and likely depictions occur in art around the Mediterranean from 9000 to 3700 years ago.

Wikipedia – Transgender History

How long has the Hindu religion been around for?

Hinduism is the world’s oldest religion, according to many scholars, dating back more than 4,000 years. Hinduism is the third-largest religion behind Christianity and Islam. Roughly 95 percent of the world’s Hindus live in India.

Witches and Transgender.

Now TERFS LOVE to appropriate Witches and their lives for their transphobia. Why? Because a woman author wrote about magic, that’s it. This is why you will find a lot of ACTUAL Witch communities, accept trans people. Witches, generally, “uprise” against the patriarchy. Witches have always been persecuted for being women who are “different” not part of the “norm”. Or COURSE, trans people and witches can relate to one another.

TERFS are honestly more to be the type of women, who do this…TERFs are more likely to be the Abigail Williams of Salem, rather than the women she “helped” be burned, hanged and tortured to death.

Burn The Witch Halloween GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

Photographer explores rituals and traditions of Romania’s modern witches

“Although many would say it’s just a coincidence, this really did happen,” Romanian photographer Virginia Lupu wrote to me shortly after, recalling the incident. Lupu, previously known for her images of transgender Romanians, has befriended the witches and captured them in intimate photographs.

Alina Cohen, Updated 28th October 2020

Romania has had Witches for CENTURIES, and the Romanian people truly believe in their powers as well. If you want a curse, they’ll do it and it might just be coincidence, but it does seem to work, lol.

Some VERY Ancient History:

Ancient Egypt had third gender categories, including for eunuchs. In the Tale of Two Brothers (from 3200 years ago), Bata removes his penis and tells his wife “I am a woman just like you”; (before his body is restored) .MutSekhmet and other goddesses are sometimes represented androgynously, with erect penises, and Anat wears clothes of both men and women.

The Nuba peoples of Sudan (including the Otoro NubaNyimaTiraKrongo, and Mesakin), have traditional roles for male-assigned people who dress and live as women and may marry men, which have been seen as transgender roles. However, trans people face discrimination in the modern Sudanese state, and cross-dressing is illegal.

North America

Prior to western contact, some Native American tribes had third-gender roles, like the Diné (Navajo) nádleehi and the Zuni lhamana. European anthropologists usually referred to these people as berdaches, which Indigenous people have always considered an offensive slur. In 1990, some Indigenous North Americans, largely in academia, adopted the pan-Indian neologism two-spirit, as an attempt to organize inter-tribally. Though acceptance of this term in traditional Native communities which already have their own terms for such people has been limited, it has generally met with more acceptance than the slur it replaced.

There is archaeological evidence that trans- or third-gender individuals existed in California 2500 years ago at rates comparable to those at which they exist among indigenous peoples there in the modern era, and archaeological and ethnographic evidence suggests third-gender categories may be of great antiquity in North America overall; suggests they may go back to the first migrations of people from eastern Asia and Siberia over 10,000 years ago.

Doesn’t really sound like being trans is just a modern “fad”. In FACT, sounds like trans people, in some language or another have been around before even Christianity. 10,000 years ago. Doesn’t sound really that recent to me…How about you?

However, sexuality has been quite repressed in Indigenous culture since colonisation.

“Colonisation, in a sense, silenced that kind of expression and behaviours,” said Troy-Anthony.

Troy-Anthony also told The Hook Up that Aboriginal people suppressed or hid their sexuality as a survival mechanism after Christianisation and colonisation.