So next week…

I am currently unsure of what is going to happen next week, but I still want to run up to it with a lot of fun!

How do you do it though? When emotionally, may not physically have a lot of things going…How do you bring the fun?!

You know how like yesterday, I was writing about my changes? I have decided to do a proper online book discussion, once a week through my Discord channel. There’s few people I can reach out to via there. However, it should be fun! I don’t think I can put a schedule on it. I was thinking of doing it on a Sunday evening, so nothing to “hard”. Just a chat with tea =D We can all talk about what we’re enjoying reading =D

International Book Friends Club

So that’s something fun, I am looking forward too =D Sunday nights, doesn’t matter if I’m working the next day or not. I get bored easily, lol. Just something to finish off at least my weekend, lol.

On a completely related topic, do any of you play the Facebook “People You May Know” game? If you don’t know what the game is. It’s where you look through the FB list of ‘people you may know’ and try to guess if you know who they are also friends with.

(Can you tell I’m struggling to find inspiration ?lol)

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The Samhain

Samhain dates back to Gaelic Ireland and is attested in some of the earliest Irish literature from the 10th century. It was one of four seasonal festivals, the others being Beltane, Imbolc, and Lughnasadh, and was thought to have been one of the most important festivals of the year. At the start of the celebration at sunset on October 31st, Samhain ceremonies and festivities would begin. People would gather and start bonfires and animals and crops were burned as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. It was a way of giving the Celtic Gods and Goddesses their share of the crops and herds from the previous year. In addition to being used for sacrifice, these fires were considered sacred and served to cleanse the old year and prepare for the new year.

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With the rise of Christianity, Halloween was actually thought by many to have been created in an attempt to replace Samhain. Halloween, or All Hallow’s Eve, is celebrated in much the same way as Samhain with costumes, celebrations, and more. The two holidays, while definitely intertwined when it comes to their history, do differ from one another as Samhain has roots in paganism while Halloween has roots in Christianity. Like killing witches and pagans and druids.

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