Thursday Theories – Aphrodite, Venus

This is the theory that actually inspired me to write about Theories.

You can get the link here, where I first became really interested in writing about these topics. I needed to do more research into other theories first, so I had more than just this one. Fantastic thing though, I am in love with programs from National Geographic. Always an interesting starting point

This blog post is about the Goddess, Venus.

There are three different Gods, they talk about. The one that spoke to me most though, the one that really got me, was the episode about Venus.

As you probably all know, Gods and Goddesses are generally taken from other cultures. So Venus, is more than likely based on Aphrodite.

The biggest reason why this particular video, episode of the series fascinated me was because, and in case you hadn’t noticed, I consider myself to be a trans ally. Now I had tapped the three episodes at the beginning of 2020, but didn’t actually get around to watching them until closer to the end, because we needed more space.

When I got around to watching it. The Professor, begins in Cyprus, the goddess’s birthplace, Bettany decodes Venus’s relationship to the Greek goddess Aphrodite, and, in turn, Aphrodite’s mixed-up origins both as a Cypriot spirit of fertility and procreation – but also, as a descendant of the prehistoric war goddesses of the Near and Middle East, Ishtar, Inanna and Astarte. We start to see the Venus is about desire of all kinds – malign as well as benign. Hughes meets world experts who reveal the mysterious and obscure ways this ancient goddess was imagined and worshipped (including as a bearded, gender-fluid woman and even as a giant, sinister, volcanic rock).

Which is obviously a far cry from the “set in stone” so to speak, image of Venus being a all “natural” woman. It really did peak my interest, considering how many TERFs out there, use Venus/Aphrodite as being nothing more than a woman. When you really get into it, Venus, Aphrodite, Ishtar, Innana and Astarte weren’t necessarily worshiped because of love and chocolates. But more they were worshipped, because of the strong feelings they invoked in individuals. Strong feelings of love and hate, of desire, of sexuality.